Skip to main content

Top 5 Ruby on Rails Tutorials for Beginners

The tagline “a programmer’s best friend” gives an easy impression as to why the Ruby software is so popular.
Yukihiro Matsumoto, Ruby’s creator, has explained Ruby as, “Ruby is simple in appearance, but is very complex inside, just like our human body”. This explains why so many programmers flock to the program. Likewise Ruby on Rails, or RoR, has been met with equal enthusiasm. RoR is the framework built off of Ruby scripting that allows programmers to create applications through the Ruby language. For regular users this is all common knowledge. But what if you are just learning the ropes of RoR? Here are the top five tutorials to help a beginner user out:


1. Ruby on Rails Tutorial

This tutorial by Michael Hart goes through the basics of Ruby on Rails in a very in depth manner, giving the reader a firm grasp on everything you need to know to successfully use RoR. To supplement the information you are also given detailed examples, which will help users make the connection between what they’re reading and how to implement it in real life.

Link: http://ruby.railstutorial.org/ruby-on-rails-tutorial-book

2. Four Days on Rails

This tutorial helps you take you past the broad view of RoR and show you everything in all the nooks and crannies of the program. You can access PDFs of the tutorial in English, Spanish, Japanese, Chinese, and a zip format of the code, making it a tutorial that is helpful across the board. It helps to cut past all the fluff information you’ll find online and leave you with useful tools to use RoR successfully.

Link: http://rails.homelinux.org/

3. Beginner’s Guide to Rails

This tutorial is geared toward beginners who know nothing about RoR and are looking to learn all about it through a series of tutorials. Unlike other tutorials which are aimed at people already using RoR, this starts at the very beginning and teaches anything and everything you need to know about constructing applications.

Link: http://godbit.com/article/beginners-guide-to-rails-part-1

4. RailsforZombies.org

This tutorial goes through the basics of RoR with an interesting and fun twist. You watch videos and then you have a period of time after the video to test out what you were just taught. This is great for people that need the hands-on learning experience versus just reading about it.

Link: http://www.codeschool.com/courses/rails-for-zombies


5. Fast Track Web Application Development with Ruby on Rails

This article written by IBM takes you through an overview of RoR. If you aren’t interested in a full in-depth look at RoR, this is a good way to get a grasp of what’s going on without taking a huge chunk of time to sit down and read.

Link: http://www.ibm.com/developerworks/linux/library/l-rubyrails/

There are a lot of resources out there to learn about the popular Ruby on Rails web application and Ruby language and it can be hard to pick out which resources to utilize. The great thing about all of the above-listed tutorials is that they’re all free and very comprehensive, so they’re a good place to get your feet wet before you dive in!

Author Bio:

Jason Miner plays a vital role for www.blogcarnival.com. He is an expert in writing topics of different categories. He is helping the carnival team to grow & working on making this an even better place for bloggers.

This is a guest article about top five beginner tutorials on Ruby on Rails. To write guest articles for us please follow the link below.

How to Write Guest Articles for Us

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Building Blocks for Virtual Businesses : Key technological systems you must have to succeed in the remote business world

This is a guest post by Ripley Daniels about "Key technological systems you must have to succeed in the remote business world.

Whenever I tell friends I had a tough day at the office, they laugh at me. That's because they know I don't really have an office. I work very hard but I work for a company that is completely remote. Only a few of my co-workers ever go into an office at all and when they do, it's only for short periods of time. Our "office" is a virtual one. To us, the traditional office workplace is a thing of the past, alongside Tyrannosaurus Rex, the slide rule, and telephones where you stick your finger in a hole and turn a dial.
Unfortunately, none of this prevents me from having tough days. I still have them. But the reasons have nothing to do with the fact that my co-workers and I don't have a brick and mortar edifice that we can use to plan, strategize, hold our meetings, make presentations, discuss sensitive business topics, build relatio…

A Peek at the Google Music Beta Install Process

This is a guest post by Nadia Jones.

Those of you in the United States might have noticed that Google Music Beta has started to get some buzz on the internet. Invites have gone out wave after wave, and as one of the people to get an early look at the application, I have to say that it's definitely worth your time to get in on this as soon as possible. I've used it for a few days and can say that it's greatly simplified my music experience. I no longer have to worry about which songs are on my work computer or home computer, nor do I have to carry around my iPod and my Android, as I can access my Google music on the phone as well.

Perhaps the greatest thing about Google Music Beta is that the install process hardly takes any time at all, which is what we've come to expect from the people at Google.

Once you get the invite in your email, click on the link and Google will take you through a series of installation steps: you will electronically accept some terms, install t…

Motorola Droid 4 – The RAZR with a QWERTY

This is a guest post by Simon about Motorola Droid 4. After a bit of a slump when the first iPhone was launched, Motorola managed to pull itself back from the brink by releasing the Motorola Droid (also known as the Milestone in some markets). This highly popular Android device came with a slide-out QWERTY keyboard and has been one of the most popular phone brands in recent years.

Motorola has since produced 3 Droid phones, although only 2 of these made an appearance outside of the US. Now the company is set to launch its fourth Droid, which builds on earlier versions while also sharing many design characteristics with the new RAZR.

Like the RAZR, the Droid 4 is powered by a dual core 1.2GHz chip with 1GB RAM, and comes with full LTE support. The screen is a little smaller than the RAZR's, measuring just 4 inches instead of 4.3, but the phone does come with a physical QWERTY keyboard, a major factor in the popularity and success of earlier Droid phones.

The Droid 4 also sees an im…

Archive

Show more