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3 Things to Avoid as a Motivational Speaker

Motivational speakers deliver at least hour-long speeches about positive thinking and how to better yourself and the people around you. These messages often apply to a wide variety of settings, whether at home, at work, or even at a personal level. If you're ever planning on becoming a motivational speaker, there are a lot of things that you should avoid. Here are the three of the most common ones.



No "How"

Most speakers convey the same messages: be positive, take control of your life, take action, and the like. The audience will then be given reasons why they should do this. The speaker will then proceed to list down all the rewards that await them in the future should they continue on the said path.

For instance, they tell you to develop a positive attitude. This is because being positive is contagious, and it will instill a positive attitude in others as well. The result is a better life for you and the people around you.

Simply put, the audience is told what to do and why they should do it. The speech ends, the audience gives a thunderous applause, and they leave the building wondering how they should do the things they just listened to.

When delivering your speech, avoid leaving out the "how" to the solution. If you do not know the "how," you shouldn't be in front of the audience in the first place.


Talking to the Audience as a Whole

Public speaking is called as such because you talk to the audience as a whole. With motivational speaking, however, it's a little different. In a corporate setting, for instance, you're not just talking to the whole company. You're also talking to the teams and individuals alike.

To prove a point, speakers tend to cite examples of a now-famous person did things to better his position in life. Some speakers will offer examples based off of their personal experiences. Giving examples is always good, but most of the solutions presented in those examples usually only apply to those particular scenarios.

For instance, a particular team's production is below par and you deliver messages about how to work hard and whatnot. What you didn't know is that the team leader is a jerk and everyone on his team hates him. If you knew that, you could have talked about how to put aside differences for the betterment of the team.

Not Practicing What You Preach

The best speakers have tons of experience and achievements under their belts. Jeff Kennett, for instance, is an Australian politician. Under his leadership, he brought Victoria's economy back up from almost nothing. He is now an occasional leadership and business speaker. Amanda Blair is a radio broadcaster. She successfully ran fundraisers for various charities in Australia and is now an occasional public speaker as well.

The point is that if you are going to motivate people to do something good with their lives, then you should be doing the same. Your audience will understand that motivational speakers are human just like them, but will grow to admire you and your message more if you have done something good for the community.

Author's Bio:

Michael Folgers is a consultant for corporate affairs. He's also spent two years in the public sector, training civil service professionals. He currently speaks at corporate and public events, squeezes in time to hit the bike trails whenever possible. One of his favorite public speakers is Amanda Blair.

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