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3 Ways You Can Provide Good Customer Service

As a consumer, you go back to the same place over and over again for two reasons. The first is that you like their product very much, whether it be food or otherwise. The second reason is that the people working there are pleasant. They smile at you, they are polite, they give quick service allowing you to beat rush hour every day, and they correct any mistakes that they make just to serve you the way you deserve to be served.

That is good customer service. There's no doubt that you are doing the same things mentioned above on your brick-and-mortar location. But what if you have an online side to your business? How else can you provide customer service for those who are unable to visit your physical office? There are three ways to do so.

Phone

The first and most obvious way to do it is by phone. If you have a business phone, you're already in the right track. One good way to expand your business is by getting a toll-free number. By getting one, you basically encourage both existing and potential customers to call you. Since toll-free numbers negate long-distance phone charges, you're also encouraging calls from people in faraway locations. This expands your consumer base as well as your business.

Chat

If you have an online presence for your business, another way to get new leads is through chat. If you're a big business and can afford it, you can hire programmers to write an in-house chat system. If not, there's always an alternative such as Olark. Most chat systems present themselves to your site visitors, popping up a simple message such as "Can I help you with anything?" and the like. If the visitor replies, then the chat with the representative is on. This is most effective if you're running an online store, as the chat rep can easily be the online version of a store attendant.

Email

Email support is often neglected due to the fact that they are prone to spam mail.  However, an email support system can still be effective if implemented correctly. If you've ever bought something from Amazon and emailed them with a query, a complaint, or whatever, you'd usually get a reply and a resolution to your concern in less than a day. That alone is proof that email can be effective as an alternative to phone

Customer service

The question now is whether you need to implement all of them or just some of them. It's going to depend largely on the type of business you have. For instance, a chat support system is best if you're running an online store in addition to your physical one. An email support system is best if your business is more of a service-based than a product-based one. A phone system is just great for any type of business. The important thing is to strive for good customer service. If you can keep your customers happy, they'll keep coming back and doing business with you. The best part is, they may actually bring in new customers in the form of their friends; which means more sales for you.

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Author's Bio:

Dave Carter is an independent consultant for small businesses in Australia. He's a techie whose expertise lies in the field of consumer electronics and telecommunications. He encourages good customer relationships and believes that looking into getting 1800 numbers so they can start growing beyond what they have initially imagined.

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